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  • Steve Brown

A Botanist Comes Full-Circle: From Studying to Defending Tejon Ranch


Tejon Ranch, photo by Nick Jensen, California Native Plant Society.

At 270,000 acres, Tejon Ranch is California's largest contiguous piece of private land. It is home to more than 14 percent of the state's native plant diversity on just 0.25 percent of its acreage. Please join the California Native Plant Society's Southern California Conservation Analyst, Dr. Nick Jensen, and the Mojave Desert chapter of CNPS, on a journey cataloging his efforts to explore and document the diversity of Tejon through the battle to save it from being developed.

The proposed Centennial "new city" would mean the destruction of 30,000 acres of habitat in the three proposed development areas resulting  in massive impacts to native plants and animals. At the completion of development, these areas would contain more than 34,000 single family residences, increasing the regional population by more than 100,000 people. The integrity of Tejon Ranch would be reduced and migrational corridors for rare and common species alike would be severed. 


What do we stand to lose if Centennial gets the green light?

Some of the finest native grassland in Southern California including one of the finest wildflower displays in the state.

Habitat connectivity between three ecological regions. Habitat connectivity is increasingly necessary given the reality of global climate change.

5,000+ acres of habitat for rare and common plant and animal species

Other problems to expect with Centennial

Urban sprawl and associated long-commutes, pollution, and greenhouse gas emissions.

Severed habitat corridors.

Local extirpation of plants and animals.

"For those unfamiliar with the site, Centennial would occupy the westernmost edge of the Mojave desert, a crucial ecotone between us and the Transverse and Coast Ranges, plus the Southern Sierra Nevada," notes Chris Clarke, California Desert Program Manager for the National Parks Conservation Association. "Habitat in this corner of the desert is going to be crucial as plants and animals contend with climate change."



Tejon Ranch, photo by Nick Jensen, California Native Plant Society.

A Botanist Comes Full Circle: From Studying to Defending Tejon Ranch, California's Largest Private Landholding

​At 270,000 acres, Tejon Ranch is California's largest contiguous piece of private land. It is home to more than 14% of the state's native plant diversity on just 0.25% of its acreage. Please join the California Native Plant Society's Southern California Conservation Analyst, Dr. Nick Jensen, and the Mojave Desert chapter of CNPS, on a journey cataloging his efforts to explore and document the diversity of Tejon through the battle to save it from being developed.

6:30 p.m., Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Hi-Desert Nature Museum

Yucca Valley Community Center

57116 29 Palms Hwy, Yucca Valley

Sponsored by the Mojave Desert Chapter, California Native Plant Society


Tejon Ranch, photo by Nick Jensen, California Native Plant Society.

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